Tag: product recalls

Need GHB for your next date? Buy toys made in China

Just in time for Christmas, boys and girls. Kids in Australia that consumed these aqua dots fell sick, it has since been pulled from the shelves in Australia, Spain, and from Toys R Us stores worldwide.

Chinese recall spurs demand for American-made toys

This kind of story is encouraging, though all these recalls of Chinese products have hardly made a dent in the market.

As consumers look for alternatives to Chinese-made toys following a series of recalls this year, dozens of small toy companies are struggling to meet surging demand. Some owners report online sales up as much as fivefold from last year. They’re hiring extra workers, expanding warehouses and adding extra assembly shifts.

Chinese recall spurs demand for American-made toys

Bad Chinese tires

Avoid buying these brands of tires: “Westlake, Compass, Telluride and YKS”. These are manufactured in China by the Hangzhou Zhongce company. The gum strip is not installed and these tires can fly apart at any time. The importer, Foreign Tire Sales, is claiming they can’t afford to recall these tires, so we’re on our own here.

China puts lipstick on a pig

One hundred eighty food processing plants are closed in China in an attempt to save face on the world market. Check this out, from the China Daily:

Industrial raw materials, such as dyes, mineral oils, paraffin wax, formaldehyde and the carcinogenic malachite green, have been used in the production of flour, candy, pickles, biscuits, black fungus, melon seeds, bean curd and seafood.

Some processors also use recycled or expired food in their operations, according to the General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine.

“These are not isolated cases,” Han Yi, director of the administration’s quality control and inspection department, said at a press conference.

He said most of the cases involved small, unlicensed food-processing plants employing less than 10 people. All plants caught engaging in illegal practices have been shut down, he added.

Administration figures show that about 75 percent of the 1 million food-processing plants in the country are small and privately owned.

180 plants shut down. But there are 1 million food processing plants in China. Think about that.

450,000 tires may separate any day now: Thanks China!

Even if you don’t buy from China, you are still endangered by the faulty products imported from there.

Ms. Hopkins said the agency’s top officials were “outraged” that Foreign Tire Sales’ executives waited more than two years to pass on their suspicions about problems with the tires. The company first suspected problems in October 2005. Almost a year later, in September 2006, the Chinese manufacturer, Hangzhou Zhongce Rubber, a former state-owned company based in eastern China, acknowledged that a gum strip that prevents the tread from separating was left out of the manufacturing process.

Hangzhou Zhongce admitted in September 2006 that it had “unilaterally decided to omit the gum strips” in the tires, the report says. The Chinese company was “generally unresponsive” when asked how many tires were involved and what they were going to do to resolve the problem, the report says.

Is it time to revisit the policy of open arms to Chinese products at any cost? I’m generally a free trader, but trade in China was initially a way of isolating the Soviet Union. Thirty years later, the geopolitical climate has shifted and so must American priorities.